(608) 241-0848
New Madison Offices
664 W Washington Ave. Madison, WI  
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4901 Cottage Grove Rd, Madison, WI  
At the WIldwood Family Clinic


Stoughton Office
225 Church St, Stoughton WI
Adjacent to the Stoughton Hospital

Posts for category: Foot Care

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
January 17, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Footwear  

While high-heeled shoes may look stylish or complement your favorite outfit, they are rarely the best option for a woman's feet. According to a study by the American Podiatric Medical Association, 39 percent of women wear high heels every day; of the women who wear heels daily, three out of four reported foot problems. Despite these numbers, many women continue to underestimate the health risks associated with high heels.

High-heeled shoes disrupt the body's alignment, crowd the toes and force the body's weight onto the ball of the foot. Wearing heels can contribute to a variety of foot and ankle problems, including:
 

  • Achilles tendonitis: The Achilles tendon and calf muscles tighten and shorten as the front of the foot moves down in relation to the heel. This causes stress and painful inflammation of the Achilles tendon.

  • Bunion:. Narrow-toed shoes can cause a bony growth on the joint at the base of the big toe. The bunion forces the big toe to slant in toward the other toes, resulting in discomfort, blisters, corns and calluses.

  • Hammertoes: A narrow toe box crowds the smaller toes into a bent, claw-like position at the middle joint.

  • Metatarsalgia: Continued high heel wear can lead to joint pain in the ball of the foot as a result of heels forcing the body's weight to be redistributed.

  • Ankle injuries: Because heels impair balance and increase the risk of falling, ankle sprains and fractures are common.

  • Pump Bump: The rigid back of a pump-style shoe can cause pressure that irritates the heel bone, creating a bony enlargement known as Haglund's deformity.

  • Neuromas: A narrow toe box and high heel can compress and create a thickening of tissue around a nerve between the third and fourth toes, leading to pain and numbness in the toes.


Still not willing to ditch the heels? There are ways to relieve some of the damaging effects of high heels.
 

  • Avoid heels taller than 2 inches

  • Choose thicker, more stable heels. Thicker heels are still stylish, plus they lessen the stress on your feet and provide better shock absorption.

  • If you must wear heels, wear your gym shoes or flats for commuting and change into your heels once you arrive to your destination.

  • Stretch and massage your calf, heel, and foot muscles. This helps relax the muscles and tendons and prevents them from tightening and shortening.

  • Avoid shoes with pointed toes


High heel shoes can cause pain and foot deformities that can last a lifetime. So the next time you go to slip on your heels for a long day at work or a night out, consider the consequences and rethink your options. If foot pain persists, visit us for treatment.

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
January 05, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Toenail Fungus  

Also known as onychomycosis, toenail fungus can be painful, irritating and embarrassing. When you experience trauma to your nail, the nail bed is lifted, allowing fungus to invade. Without treatment, this fungus can grow and spread, particularly in dark, warm, moist environments, such as socks and shoes.

Common signs and symptoms of toenail fungus include:

  • Discoloring or yellowing of the nail

  • Thickening or crumbling of the nail

  • Swelling around the nail

  • Disfigured nails

  • Streaks or spots down the side of the nail

  • Foul-smelling debris under the nail

  • Pain and discomfort

  • Complete nail loss

Prevention is Key

Fungal infections can affect the fingernails as well as the toenails, but toenail fungus is more difficult to treat because toenails grow more slowly. Because removal of the fungus is challenging, prevention plays an important role in treatment.

  • Keep nails neatly trimmed.

  • Practice good foot hygiene, including daily washing with soap and water, drying feet and toes, carefully, and changing shoes regularly.

  • Always wear shoes in public areas, such as showers, locker rooms and pools.

  • Wear comfortable shoes that aren't too tight.

  • Avoid wearing nail polish for long periods, as it prevents the nail from breathing and can seal in fungus.

Treatment of Toenail Fungus

If you do develop toenail fungus, especially if the infection has become painful, visit our office. People with a chronic illness like diabetes should always see a podiatrist if they notice any changes in their nails, as it may be an indication of a more serious issue.

To eliminate the fungus, a podiatrist may remove as much of the infected nail as possible by trimming, filing or dissolving it. Oral or topical antifungal medications may also be prescribed to treat the infection. Laser treatment options are also sometimes available.

It’s only for severe, chronic infections that surgical removal of the nail might be recommended. Our office can help diagnose the cause of your toenail troubles, and make the best recommendation for treatment.

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
December 27, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Plantar Warts  

What your podiatrist in Madison and Stoughton wants you to knowplantar warts

If you have developed small, elevated growths on your feet, you could have plantar warts. Plantar warts are caused from exposure to a virus, which can penetrate your skin through cuts or breaks in your skin. They can go away on their own, but you may need a little help from your podiatrist. Dr. Neal Katz wants to share the facts about what to do about plantar warts. He has several office locations in Madison and Stoughton, WI to help your feet.

You may have plantar warts if you notice:

  • Small, rough growths at the base of your toes, heel, or forefoot
  • A callus of hard skin where the wart has moved inward
  • Small black pinpoints on the wart which are clotted blood vessels
  • Lesions that erupt along the ridges and lines in the skin of your foot
  • Tenderness or pain when you stand or walk

Children and teens are more commonly affected by plantar warts, but adults can get them too. You are at greater risk of experiencing plantar warts if you:

  • Have a weakened immune system
  • Have a history of plantar warts
  • Walk barefoot in public areas like locker rooms

You can try over-the-counter medications to reduce or eliminate plantar warts, but you may need the services of an expert. Dr. Katz offers several effective treatments for plantar warts including:

  • Peeling medicine containing salicylic acid, to remove individual layers of the wart
  • Freezing medicine using liquid nitrogen to freeze the wart and form a blister; dead tissue will slough off in a few days.
  • Laser treatment or surgery may be recommended for severe cases.

If you are experiencing discomfort from plantar warts and want your feet to look great again, it’s time to seek out an expert. It’s time to call Dr. Katz, with offices in Madison and Stoughton, WI. You don’t have to put up with ugly, uncomfortable plantar warts. Call today and let Dr. Katz take care of your feet!

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
December 06, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Shin Splints  

Although a shin splint is commonly used to describe various pains between the ankle and the knee, it actually refers to a specific inflammatory condition of the tibia -- a condition called medial tibial stress syndrome.

A type of "overuse injury" to the legs, the most common causes of shin splints include excessive running, poor conditioning and over-pronation (flattening of the arch). The result is pain in the front or inside of the lower leg that usually gets worse with a sudden increase in distance or intensity of training. Shin splints are a common problem for many runners and athletes. Muscle weakness, non-supportive shoes and overtraining are also contributing factors.

To prevent shin splints, warm up and stretch muscles before starting any workout activity and choose supportive footwear. Begin workouts gradually and avoid over-training. All of these methods will go a long way in helping to prevent many lower leg problems. Conservative treatment for most shin splint pain includes rest, ice, compression and elevation. Strengthening exercises, anti-inflammatory agents and custom foot orthotics may also be recommended to reduce symptoms.

Shin pain isn't always indicative of a shin splint. Lower leg pain may actually signal a more serious problem, including a stress fracture, partial muscle tear and tendonitis, all of which require special treatment. Always seek the professional care of a podiatrist if:

  • You have severe pain in your shin following an injury.
  • Your shin is hot and inflamed.
  • Swelling in your shin increases.
  • Shin pain persists during rest.

Proper diagnosis of the cause of pain is necessary in order to administer the most appropriate treatment. If you suffer from shin pain, visit your podiatrist for an evaluation and proper treatment.

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
November 15, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Healthy Feet  

Looking fabulous in your favorite pair of heels does have a price. In fact, shoes that fit poorly or have high heels frequently cause foot problems, including calluses, corns, bunions, and blisters, just to name a few.

All footwear eventually show signs of wear and tear. Inspect the condition of your own shoes. Do they appear stretched out or worn? Then you probably need a new pair. Creasing of the midsole is also a good indication that your shoes have lost their cushion and support.

Maximize Fit, Minimize Discomfort

The following tips can help you avoid purchasing a pair of shoes that may contribute to a long list of foot problems:

  • Try on shoes late in the day, when the feet tend to be a bit larger due to natural swelling
  • Women should opt for low, stable heels
  • Try on both shoes to be sure that they fit comfortably on both feet
  • Choose breathable shoe materials, such as leather, to prevent excessive sweating and blisters
  • Have your feet measured to ensure the best fit
  • Avoid pointy-toed shoes which cause bunions and hammertoes
  • Walk around the store with both shoes on to make sure the fit is comfortable
  • For athletes, choose shoes that are specific to the sport you play
  • Choose the right shoe for your foot type (e.g. if you have flat feet, select shoes with good arch support)

Still not ready to part with your favorite pair of sneakers or trendy heels? Not sure if the shoes you currently wear are right for your feet? A professional podiatrist can evaluate the condition of your feet, and work with you to find the best pair of shoes for you!



(608) 241-0848

664 W Washington Ave. Madison, WI

4901 Cottage Grove Rd, Madison, WI

225 Church St, Stoughton WI