(608) 241-0848
New Madison Offices
664 W Washington Ave. Madison, WI  
Regent St and W. Washington Ave

4901 Cottage Grove Rd, Madison, WI  
At the WIldwood Family Clinic


Stoughton Office
225 Church St, Stoughton WI
Adjacent to the Stoughton Hospital

Posts for: December, 2017

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
December 27, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Plantar Warts  

What your podiatrist in Madison and Stoughton wants you to knowplantar warts

If you have developed small, elevated growths on your feet, you could have plantar warts. Plantar warts are caused from exposure to a virus, which can penetrate your skin through cuts or breaks in your skin. They can go away on their own, but you may need a little help from your podiatrist. Dr. Neal Katz wants to share the facts about what to do about plantar warts. He has several office locations in Madison and Stoughton, WI to help your feet.

You may have plantar warts if you notice:

  • Small, rough growths at the base of your toes, heel, or forefoot
  • A callus of hard skin where the wart has moved inward
  • Small black pinpoints on the wart which are clotted blood vessels
  • Lesions that erupt along the ridges and lines in the skin of your foot
  • Tenderness or pain when you stand or walk

Children and teens are more commonly affected by plantar warts, but adults can get them too. You are at greater risk of experiencing plantar warts if you:

  • Have a weakened immune system
  • Have a history of plantar warts
  • Walk barefoot in public areas like locker rooms

You can try over-the-counter medications to reduce or eliminate plantar warts, but you may need the services of an expert. Dr. Katz offers several effective treatments for plantar warts including:

  • Peeling medicine containing salicylic acid, to remove individual layers of the wart
  • Freezing medicine using liquid nitrogen to freeze the wart and form a blister; dead tissue will slough off in a few days.
  • Laser treatment or surgery may be recommended for severe cases.

If you are experiencing discomfort from plantar warts and want your feet to look great again, it’s time to seek out an expert. It’s time to call Dr. Katz, with offices in Madison and Stoughton, WI. You don’t have to put up with ugly, uncomfortable plantar warts. Call today and let Dr. Katz take care of your feet!


By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
December 18, 2017
Category: Uncategorized

Maybe you've heard of carpal tunnel syndrome, a condition in the wrist that occurs when swelling or a change in position of the tissue within the carpal tunnel squeezes and irritates the median nerve. Similar to carpal tunnel syndrome is tarsal tunnel syndrome, an ankle condition that occurs from the compression of a nerve in a confined space.

What is Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome?

The tarsal tunnel is a narrow space located on the inside of the ankle next to the ankle bones. Protected by the tarsal tunnel are many arteries, veins, tendons and nerves, one of which is the posterior tibial nerve - the main focus of tarsal tunnel syndrome.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is caused from a compression on the posterior tibial nerve. Causes include:

  • Injury to the ankle, which may produce swelling near the nerve.
  • Abnormal blood vessels or cysts that occupy space within the tunnel.
  • Scar tissue that press against the nerve.
  • Foot deformities, such as flat feet, which increase strain on the nerve.
  • Systematic diseases, such as diabetes or arthritis.

When patients visit us at our office with tarsal tunnel syndrome, they often experience one or more symptoms, usually felt on the bottom of the foot or the inside of the ankle. In some cases, the pain may extend to the heel, arch, toes and calf. Symptoms include:

  • Pain
  • Numbness
  • Burning or tingling sensation

We Can Help

If you experience pain, burning and tingling in your feet or toes, make an appointment with our office. Left untreated, tarsal tunnel syndrome could result in permanent nerve damage. Treatment for tarsal tunnel syndrome varies depending on the severity of your condition. Anti-inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, immobilization, rest and modifications in footwear are a few methods used to treat the damaged nerve and reduce the pain. When non-surgical treatments are unsuccessful, surgery may be recommended.


By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
December 06, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Shin Splints  

Although a shin splint is commonly used to describe various pains between the ankle and the knee, it actually refers to a specific inflammatory condition of the tibia -- a condition called medial tibial stress syndrome.

A type of "overuse injury" to the legs, the most common causes of shin splints include excessive running, poor conditioning and over-pronation (flattening of the arch). The result is pain in the front or inside of the lower leg that usually gets worse with a sudden increase in distance or intensity of training. Shin splints are a common problem for many runners and athletes. Muscle weakness, non-supportive shoes and overtraining are also contributing factors.

To prevent shin splints, warm up and stretch muscles before starting any workout activity and choose supportive footwear. Begin workouts gradually and avoid over-training. All of these methods will go a long way in helping to prevent many lower leg problems. Conservative treatment for most shin splint pain includes rest, ice, compression and elevation. Strengthening exercises, anti-inflammatory agents and custom foot orthotics may also be recommended to reduce symptoms.

Shin pain isn't always indicative of a shin splint. Lower leg pain may actually signal a more serious problem, including a stress fracture, partial muscle tear and tendonitis, all of which require special treatment. Always seek the professional care of a podiatrist if:

  • You have severe pain in your shin following an injury.
  • Your shin is hot and inflamed.
  • Swelling in your shin increases.
  • Shin pain persists during rest.

Proper diagnosis of the cause of pain is necessary in order to administer the most appropriate treatment. If you suffer from shin pain, visit your podiatrist for an evaluation and proper treatment.




Archive:

(608) 241-0848

664 W Washington Ave. Madison, WI

4901 Cottage Grove Rd, Madison, WI

225 Church St, Stoughton WI