(608) 241-0848
New Madison Offices
664 W Washington Ave. Madison, WI  
Regent St and W. Washington Ave

4901 Cottage Grove Rd, Madison, WI  
At the WIldwood Family Clinic


Stoughton Office
225 Church St, Stoughton WI
Adjacent to the Stoughton Hospital

Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
December 07, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Sesamoid   Sesamoiditis  

What is Sesamoiditis?

Sesamoids are small bones that are only connected to tendons or surrounded in muscle. This only appears in a few places in the body, one of which is the foot. Two very tiny sesamoids are found in the underside of the foot near the big toe. One is on the outer side of the foot and the other bone is close to the middle of the foot. This structure provides a smooth surface for the tendons to slide over, which helps the tendons move muscles. They help with weight bearing and also help to elevate the bones of the big toe. So now that you know what sesamoids are, you might be wondering what sesamoiditis is and what its symptoms are.

Sesamoiditis

Just like any other bone, sesamoids can unfortunately fracture. The tendons surrounding the sesamoids may also become irritated or inflamed and this is what sesamoiditis is. Sesamoiditis is also a form of tendonitis and is a common condition among ballerinas, runners, and baseball catchers due to the pressure that is constantly placed on their feet.

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis may include:

  • Pain under the big toe or ball of the foot
  • Swelling and/or bruising
  • Difficulty in bending and straightening the big toe

Treating Sesamoiditis

Treatments include:

  • Resting and stopping any activity that could be causing pain and inflammation
  • Anti-inflammatories, such as ibuprofen and aspirin only after consulting your physician
  • Icing the sole of the foot
  • Wearing soft-soled and low-heeled shoes
  • Cushioning inserts in the shoes

If symptoms persist after treatments, you may need to wear a removable brace for 4-6 weeks to help the bones heal. Call your podiatrist today to ask any questions about sesamoiditis and get on your way to pain-free feet once again!

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
November 13, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bunion  

At the Stoughton and Madison, WI offices of Dr. Neal Katz, bunion deformities are among the most treated foot conditions. Bunions are more than just unsightly and embarrassing in appearance, they can also disrupt your comfort, lifestyle, and ability to walk or run. Explore the causes, symptoms, and treatments that your foot doctor will use when dealing with a mild to severe case of bunions.

Bunion TreatmentBunion Causes
If you have a severe case of bunions, there is a good chance that they formed due to wearing shoes that are not ideal for your foot shape. One common example is wearing high-heeled shoes that crunch the toes together and put undue pressure on the whole foot. Bunions usually appear in pairs, which indicates that the problem is related to shoewear. Other risk factors include flat feet, past foot injuries, and feet that have been affected by overpronation (incorrect walking). They are more common in patients who have a genetic history of foot deformities.

Bunion Symptoms
The first symptom you’ll notice when you have a case of bunions is the gradual formation of a bump on the inside of your foot. The bump is located near the arch of the foot and may look red or swollen—especially after removing your shoes. It is the bone at the base of your big toe pressing outward. In some cases, patients do not experience pain with bunions, but in severe cases, the joints can become inflamed and painful. Uncomfortable calluses may start to form on the foot.

Bunion Treatments
In the early stages of this foot condition, bunions are easier for your Stoughton and Madison podiatrist to treat using conservative therapies. The goal is to realign the joint and give the foot a chance to straighten out over time. In some cases, simply giving the feet some rest from their daily duties can significantly reduce the symptoms of a bunion. Other treatments include footwear changes, orthotics, corn or callus removal, and night splints. Surgery is an option if the bone, joints, and ligaments need to be repaired and manually adjusted to a more favorable position.

Is a Bunion-Free Life Possible?
Yes, it’s possible to get rid of your embarrassing bunion condition -- to have feet that look and feel normal. Call (608) 241-0848 today to schedule a foot exam with Dr. Neal Katz at one of his conveniently located offices in Stoughton or Madison, WI.

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
October 22, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Warts  

What Causes Warts?

Got foot warts? Nearly everyone will have a wart at some point in their lives. Warts are typically small, hard skin growths caused by an infection with humanpallilloma virus. Foot warts are treatable. Foot warts are among the most common dermatologic conditions podiatrists treat. Read on to learn about the causes of warts.

An HPV Infection

Common warts are caused by by an HPV infection. Over 100 types of HPV exist. Certain types of HPV infection cause cervical cancer. Some types of HPV infection cause foot warts, while others cause warts that appear on the face, neck, or hands. Of the 100 types of HPV, about 60 cause common warts on areas such as the hands or feet.

Skin-To-Skin Contact

Wart viruses are contagious. You can get foot warts from skin-to-skin contact with people who have warts. However, not all HPV strains are highly contagious. You can get the wart virus by touching an object that another person's wart touched, such as clothing, towels, shoes, or exercise equipment.


Breaks in Your Skin

HPV infects the top layer of skin and usually enters the body in an area of damaged or cut skin. Cuts from shaving can provide an avenue for infection. Getting a scrape can also bring on common warts. Foot warts are very common in swimmers whose feet are scratched by rough pool surfaces.

A Weak Immune System

In most cases, your immune system defeats an HPV infection before it creates a wart. Someone with a weakened immune system is more vulnerable and therefore more likely to develop warts. Immune systems can be weakened by HIV or by immunosuppressant drugs used after organ transplants.


If you want to get rid of foot warts, see your podiatrist as soon as possible. Many types of effective wart treatments are available. They include salicylic acid, cantharidin, cryotherapy, laser treatment, and surgery. Your podiatrist can help you get rid of foot warts once and for all!

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
September 04, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Plantar Warts  

Find out why warts sometimes develop on feet and how to get rid of them.

 

Most people, especially children, may develop warts at some point. These skin-colored growths are benign and often harmless; however, Plantar Wartssometimes they can appear in places that are a bit uncomfortable or embarrassing. For example, plantar warts are warts that develop on the soles of your feet. As you might imagine, this problem can be rather uncomfortable and make walking around or standing painful, at times. Our Madison and Stoughton, WI, podiatrist Dr. Neal Katz is here to tell you more about why plantar warts happen and how to treat them.

What causes plantar warts?

All warts are caused by a viral infection known as the human papillomavirus (HPV). There are many different strains of HPV, and while there are some strains that can lead to other issues such as genital warts, rest assured that the strain that causes genital warts is not the same as the strain that is responsible for plantar warts.

How can I treat plantar warts?

Most people don’t realize this, but warts will often go away all on their own after a couple of years even without treatment; however, patients dealing with plantar warts might find them uncomfortable or irritating because they are on the soles of your feet. If you find that your plantar warts are making it difficult to walk around or are causing you discomfort then you should visit your Madison, WI, foot doctor for an evaluation.

If you don’t want to wait for the warts to go away over time then our goal will be to remove them during your visit. There are several ways in which to do this:

  • Applying a topical solution containing salicylic acid (it take several weeks to see results)
  • Burning off the warts
  • Liquid nitrogen (to freeze the wart)
  • Laser treatment
  • Minor surgery (to cut off the wart)

If you or someone in your family is dealing with plantar warts it’s a good idea to come in for an evaluation. After all, there are other growths that can develop that look similar to warts, and it’s a good idea to have a professional opinion before you start treating the issue yourself. Our podiatrists offer two locations in Madison, WI, and one in Stoughton, WI, to serve you better. Call one of our offices today to schedule an appointment.

By Dr. Neal J. Katz DPM
August 14, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Poor Circulation  

Are you experiencing numbness, tingling, or discolorations in your feet?

Even though poor circulation isn’t a condition, if you are experiencing poor circulation in your feet this is often a symptom of a much larger issue. This is why it’s important to understand the warning signs of poor circulation and when to see a podiatrist, as many of these conditions can be serious or cause further complications to your health.

Causes of Poor Circulation

There are many reasons why someone may have poor circulation. The most common conditions include:

1. Peripheral artery disease (PAD)

This causes poor circulation in the legs due to a narrowing in the arteries and blood vessels. Over time this condition can cause damage to nerves or tissue. While this condition can occur in younger people, particularly smokers, it’s more common for people over 50 years old to develop PAD.

2. Blood Clots

A blood clot causes a block or restriction in blood flow and can develop anywhere in the body. The most common places for a blood clot include the arms or the legs, which can lead to symptoms of poor circulation. In some cases, a blood clot can cause serious complications such as a stroke.

3. Diabetes

While this condition does affect blood sugar levels, it is also known to affect circulation within the body. Those with circulation issues may experience cramping in the legs that may get worse when you are active. Those with diabetic neuropathy may experience nerve damage in the legs and feet, as well as numbness or tingling.

4. Raynaud’s Disease

A less common condition, Raynaud’s disease causes chronic cold fingers and feet due to the narrowing of the arteries in the hands and toes. Since these arteries are narrow it’s more difficult for blood to flow to these areas, leading to poor circulation. Of course, you may experience these symptoms in other parts of the body besides your toes or fingers, such as your nose, ears, or lips.

Warning Signs of Poor Circulation

You may be experiencing poor circulation in your feet if you are experiencing these symptoms:

  • Numbness
  • Pain that may radiate into the limbs
  • Tingling (a “pins and needles” sensation)
  • Muscle cramping

If you are experiencing symptoms of poor circulation that don’t go away it’s best to play it safe rather than sorry and turn to a podiatric specialist who can provide a proper diagnosis and determine the best approach for improving circulation. Don’t ignore this issue.



Archive:

(608) 241-0848

664 W Washington Ave. Madison, WI

4901 Cottage Grove Rd, Madison, WI

225 Church St, Stoughton WI